Archive for the ‘1989 Ford Mustang convertible’ Category

Mustang for sale.

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

Unfortunately, due to many factors including lack of time, funding, housing issues, lack of use, storage, the fact that it is not a practical daily driver, and so on … the Mustang is now up for sale. This is the car that got me into cars, and the first car I ever bought, so it’s hard to let it go, but I have had lots of fun and learned a lot with it over the years. If interested … leave a comment!

The Mustang Grows Up.

Saturday, October 13th, 2012

With the .030″ overbore the Mustang has gained 4 whole cubic inches and gone from sub 5 liters to over 5 liters! 🙂

Ok, so finally here’s the big update. I’ll start with a picture of the upper intake plate I machined with the ever-popular 5.0CD logo! My EGR delete plate also has the logo, but it’s a little hard to see back there. It’s all back together and functional, and I’ll outline some of the dumb moves I pulled and other bumps in the road on the way to the triumph of it actually being done and running.

5.0CD upper intake plate

5.0CD upper intake plate

Where I last left off, the pilot bearing issue had just been taken care of. After that, I had a few things to reconnect like exhaust, o2, wiring, get the belt on, and all that little stuff. On to the next crisis. I filled it up with fluids for the first time and fired it up for the moment of truth … it sounded terrible! The lifters were extremely loud. So I shut it off after a few seconds. Hm. The rockers must need to be adjusted, I thought. Not really the most fun task since it involves removing the valvecovers (which is actually doable without taking off the upper intake because of my phenolic spacer, which is handy!) shimming the pedestals, and a lot of turning over the engine by hand. I ended up doing this and changing the thickness of a couple of the shims, but at the end of work one day out of the blue it hit me what really happened … somehow I remembered that I had never put in the oil pump driveshaft! That was a stupid move and it could have been disastrous if I didn’t catch it when I did. It had hardly run and there was plenty of assembly lube in there, so it should be fine, I figured.

When I pulled the engine, I accidentally yanked the trans dipstick out of its hole when unbolting the trans, which dumped fluid everywhere so I had to top that off also. The brakes are a little soft from sitting and I think they might have to be re-bled at some point, but they work ok for now. I had run it a few times to move it around but hadn’t really gotten a chance to test it out, which I did yesterday. It still had the hood off, so decided to put that on today. I’m assuming that due to the old sagged mounts, it made just enough hood clearance for the engine – it’s always rubbed and hit in a few spots, I really need a cowl hood. In other words, the hood wouldn’t shut with all the new gear. As a temporary measure we put in some washers to space up the back of the hood just so it will close. It looks funny, but it works for now.

As for the test runs, it feels good. Really good. Partly because of the old tires out back and I’d like to think partly because of the bigger cam, it really winds up fast and it will spin the tires with almost no effort at all. I was a little surprised when I got on it a bit how little it took before traction was out the window. I also wondered if the hyper pistons maybe contribute to a slightly lighter rotating mass, but that’s just speculation. Anyhow, I couldn’t help but do another lap around the block today and distribute some of my rubber off the tires to the pavement where it belongs.  It made me feel better after my Sunbird woes of the day which will be chronicled in an upcoming post. The only things left for it now are to make it legal and get it registered, and then I’d like to get the AEM wideband installed so I can keep an eye on the air/fuel and keep the new motor out of trouble. Then I’d like to feed it some nitrous. Oh yeah, and the cage has to go in too.

The original 5.0 lasted a whole lot of drag passes, hard use, and a lot of fun miles, so here’s hoping the same from this one!

4 more cubic inches!

4 more cubic inches!

re-engined

re-engined

306.

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

When parking the Mustang for the winter at the end of 2010, the bottom end was making some terrible noises. So there it sat until I could scrape together the funds and time to rebuild. Already in the stable was a .030 over block and cheap Summit rebuild kit with hyper pistons, gaskets, etc. I decided to take a break in the gradual GN build and slap together a functional 5.0 and quickly get the thing back on the road. The rotating assembly went out for balancing and was done in no time. My rods had to be resized, which I wasn’t planning on, so the cost was a bit more than I expected, but so be it, the ball was now rolling. The bottom end went together pretty fast and smooth with no real major problems. Upon measuring the piston to deck height, and seeing that the new pistons had 8cc reliefs, I realized that factory .047 headgaskets were going to net me a rather low 8.9:1 compression. My plans are most likely some nitrous in the future, not forced induction, so that was a little low for my taste. Some more careful part selection back when I bought everything would have avoided all this, but I just wanted it to function at this point, not start back from square one with different pistons. Instead I found some Mr Gasket .038 head gaskets which would send it up to 9.1:1 – a little more respectable and higher than the stock 9:1 instead of lower. Good enough.

The old engine came out without much trouble, and my mission was to reuse everything I could and keep money and time spent to a minimum. That doesn’t usually go quite as planned, and this was no exception. I hear the P heads come with some pretty mediocre valve springs, and although I never had any issues, I didn’t really want to chance it now that I was putting in a higher lift Trick Flow cam (this is about the one thing that I splurged on that wasn’t totally necessary.) As luck would have it, I already had a Trick Flow spring kit that was installed on my original E7 heads and had seen very little use. Once the heads were off, a quick inspection showed that some of the valves had a decent amount of carbon buildup and I couldn’t just let that slide. So minus one on the time spent category as I removed and cleaned each valve while swapping valve springs from one head to another (which is kind of a pain with my cheap valvespring compressor) and installing new seals along the way. The guides seemed to be in decent shape, so that helped in the cost department. After that, it was just installing most of the old parts onto the block which didn’t present any real challenges. I had a partial ARP bolt kit, but had to get a few extra items from the hardware store to finish it off.

Here’s where it got interesting. I was looking pretty good on schedule to finish by the first week of September, when I finally hit the snags I’ve come to expect. I decided to upgrade to some Prothane motor mounts (originals were old and shot) and so had to remove the old ones of course. Passenger side, no problem – except for having to dig out the never-used 21mm socket for the oddball 14mm metric nut anyway. Driver side, frozen. Grab the breaker bar, start turning and then the dripping starts. I broke the nut free, but also broke the power steering line in the process. Naturally, none of the 3 auto parts stores (that were open) could get me the line for days, so another setback of time. Ok, I decided, let’s deal with that later and at least get the engine in. With some help, in it goes. When mating it to the trans, however, things were not falling into place. After some thought, I realized that I had forgotten this engine originally was equipped with a manual transmission. So, I’m sure you know where I’m going with this, but the pilot bearing was still in the crank preventing the torque converter from seating in as it should – I had not even thought to check before dropping in the motor. Back out it comes. Then the search for a pilot bearing puller began, which I was not able to get until the next day. So overnight it was dropped into the bay to sit until it could be again hoisted and the bearing could be removed and then dropped back in once again finally.

That is the update until the rest of the little things can be buttoned up, so maybe another week or two at most (busy schedule) and it will be back on the road. Enough to get a little use out of it during the fall, I hope, and then ready for some serious use next summer!

Update: some mid-swap photos.

old engine before teardown

old engine before teardown

enginelesstang

enginelesstang

5.0 EGR delete plate dimensions.

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

When I decided to make an EGR delete plate for the Mustang’s 306 build (more on that to follow,) I didn’t have my EGR valve handy, so I did some searching online for dimensions, figuring it had been done a hundred times before and probably documented somewhere with some useful numbers. Not so much. So here they are for anyone else who would rather make than purchase a block off plate.

A few notes: The original has an elongated hole on the bottom, not sure why, but it’s easier to just put a regular hole in. The only really important thing is the spacing between the two holes and their size, it doesn’t matter too much if you just get the outside shape to a rough approximation depending on what tools you may have available. I used a piece of 1/4″ thick aluminum, but you can use whatever you want as long as it is rigid and flat enough to seal. I added in rough countersink sizes if you want a nice clean look using flathead screws, but it’s quick and easy to use the existing studs and nuts and skip that step (this is what I have done temporarily until I get around to getting some flatheads.) Also, when deleting the EGR, you can either buy or build a simulator (diagram is below and can be found with some searching, however I have not yet tested it) to prevent ECU codes.

5.0 EGR delete plate

EGR simulator

EGR simulator

Buick vs. Ford

Sunday, September 2nd, 2012

Just a look at what’s brewing in the 5.OCD shop.

buick vs ford

buick vs ford

Megasquirt!

Monday, December 22nd, 2008

2/15/10 A year has passed, and the Megasquirt is finally hooked up in the Mustang and has fired it up for the first time! (photo at bottom) I still have a lot of learning to do about tuning and getting everything ironed out (good weather for test driving will help also,) but I’m looking forward to it. Before that, though, I still have to run a permanent MAP line, machine the radio delete plate for mounting the MS there, and get my JAW wideband hooked up and mounted so I’m not stuck using only the narrowband. Oh yeah, I have to figure out how to set up the nitrous control with MS, also, but that will wait until I get a better handle on tuning and a decent tune.


2/15/09 A formerly unassembled Megasquirt v1 pcb3.0 from diyautotune is now completed and functional. I’ll be using an EEC-IV adapter board for zero rewiring, which only needs a few jumpers to be complete. All I need now is a relay cable and to read up more on Megatune.

Megasquirt 1 pcb3.0 build

Megasquirt 1 pcb3.0 build

Megasquirt 1 pcb3.0 built

Megasquirt 1 pcb3.0 built


Explorerized.

Monday, December 22nd, 2008

My first attempt at the GT40P Explorer iron head swap ended up in a bad head gasket, lots of smoke, and no power. Attempt two a year later was much more successful, and I took the time to powdercoat everything while it was apart. The Explorer heads and intake are cheap power, which I’m all about, and have propelled the car into the mid 13s. They are currently unported, and I want to see what kind of times I can get out of them as they are (I think they are capable of low 13s) for now.

GT40P heads

GT40P heads

Explorer upper and lower intakes

Explorer upper and lower intakes

parts

parts

Ten Holes.

Monday, December 22nd, 2008

That’s right, the best wheel for a fox body Mustang – ten holes! I admit, I have a ten hole problem. I can’t pass up buying them and consequently have lots of them.

ten hole

ten hole